Keep US Covered Statement on 1-Year Anniversary of Biden Executive Order Targeting ICHRA and STLDI Rules

Continues to Urge the Administration to Follow Through to Protect Working People

 

January 28, 2022 

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Keep US Covered, a campaign committed to enhancing quality health coverage and improving care for working Americans, released the following statement to mark the 1-year anniversary of President Biden’s executive order that sought to improve health coverage for Americans and strengthen the Affordable Care Act:
 
“It has been one year since President Biden put two harmful health care regulations enacted by the previous administration on notice, but we still need action to protect working people,” said Keep US Covered Executive Director Sonja Nesbit. “ICHRAs open the door to discrimination in the workplace, saddling working Americans with inferior coverage and worsening health care disparities. The expansion of junk insurance has also left American families exposed to unaffordable medical bills. Both policies undermine the shared goal of giving all Americans access to affordable, quality health coverage. One year later, Keep US Covered remains committed to supporting the Biden Administration’s goal of closing the health disparity gap and urges them to do away with these Trump-era rules.”
 
Background: Despite singling out the rules that created Individual Coverage Health Reimbursement Arrangements (ICHRAs) and drastically expanded the availability of Short-Term Limited Duration Insurance (STLDI) plans in 
Executive Order (EO) 14009 signed on January 28, 2021, the Biden Administration has yet to take meaningful action to address these two harmful regulations enacted under the previous president.
 
In September of last year, Keep US Covered was joined by seven advocacy organizations representing patients, health care providers, and small businesses in signing a 
joint letter to President Biden and the heads of relevant agencies urging action on behalf of working Americans.
 
To learn more about Keep US Covered and its partners’ work to educate policymakers on these regulations and the social determinants of health, visit 
KeepUSCovered.org or follow the campaign on Twitter and Facebook.